7 Fluids in your car that you should be checking
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1. Motor Oil

Motor oil, engine oil, or engine lubricant is any one of various substances that consist of base oils enhanced with various additives, particularly antiwear additives, detergents, dispersants, and, for multi-grade oils, viscosity index improvers. Motor oil is used for lubrication of internal combustion engines.


2. Transmission fluids

While the primary function of transmission fluids is to lubricate the various parts of the transmission, it can serve other functions as well: Clean and protect metal surfaces from wear. Condition gaskets. Enhance cooling function and reduce high operating temperatures.


3. Brake Fluid

Brake fluid is a type of hydraulic fluid used in hydraulic brake and hydraulic clutch applications in automobiles, motorcycles, light trucks, and some bicycles. It is used to transfer force into pressure, and to amplify braking force. It works because liquids are not appreciably compressible.


4. Power steering Fluid

Power steering fluid is the hydraulic fluid that transmits the power in your steering system. In a bit more detail, it helps create the pressure that pushes on either side of your car’s rack-mounted piston, allowing you to turn the wheels with ease.


5. Washer fluid

Windshield washer fluid is a fluid for motor vehicles that is used in cleaning the windshield with the windshield wiper while the vehicle is being driven.


6. Radiator Fluid

Engine coolant, also known as antifreeze, is mixed with water to keep the radiator from freezing in extreme cold and stops


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corrosion within the cooling system. There are many different types of coolant, so it’s important to know what variety is right for your car or truck.


7. Air conditioning coolants

A cold liquid refrigerant absorbs heat from the hotter room in the evaporator, cooling the room down. The refrigerant then changes phase to a gas and is put through a compressor to increase its temperature.

The refrigerant then passes through the condenser coils, transferring heat from the refrigerant to the outside air. Refrigerant expands in order to decrease its pressure and cool down to below the room’s temperature to repeat the cycle again.

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